Teaching and learning in medicine

Compliance of medical students with voluntary use of personal data assistants for clerkship assessments.

Publication Date: 
Oct 15, 2008

BACKGROUND: For several years, final-year students at McMaster University have been required to complete 10 mini-CEX type assessments per rotation. A similar system was being introduced at Ottawa.

Personal digital assistants: a review of current and potential utilization among medical residents.

Author(s): 
Publication Date: 
Mar 30, 2009

BACKGROUND: Increases in the daily work load of medical residents, coupled with constraints on their work hours have made personal digital assistants (PDAs) an increasingly popular management resource. No comprehensive review of PDA utilization among medical residents has been published.

Using patient encounter logs for mandated clinical encounters in an internal medicine clerkship.

Publication Date: 
Feb 25, 2010

BACKGROUND: Patient encounter logs help assess a student's educational experience. The use of a grading incentive linked to the mandatory documentation of prespecified clinical encounters has been insufficiently studied.

The impact of a personal digital assistant (PDA) case log in a medical student clerkship.

Publication Date: 
Feb 25, 2010

BACKGROUND: Medical education literature emphasizes that reflection and self-audit are pivotal steps in learning and that personal digital assistants (PDAs) have potential as decision support tools.

Preclinical preceptorships in medical school: can curricular objectives be met in diverse teaching settings?

Publication Date: 
Apr 21, 2006

BACKGROUND: Although preclinical preceptorships for medical students during the first 2 years are now common, little is known about how well the curricular objectives can be met in clinical training sites.

Medicine clerkships and portable computing: a national survey of internal medicine clerkship directors.

Publication Date: 
Apr 14, 2010

BACKGROUND: Portable computers are widely used by medical trainees, but there is a lack of data on how these devices are used in clinical education programs.