Education, Nursing, Graduate

The USU medical PDA initiative: the PDA as an educational tool.

Publication Date: 
Dec 04, 2002

A medical personal digital assistant (PDA) initiative for healthcare students began in 2000 at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU). The University issued PDAs to Graduate School of Nursing (GSN) and School of Medicine (SOM) students.

The development of an online clinical log for advanced practice nursing students: a case study.

Publication Date: 
Oct 03, 2007

Three years ago at the Medinfo conference a prototype version of a clinical log for nursing students at Vanderbilt University was demonstrated. The purpose of the log is to document the types of clinical experiences the students are participating in as part of their academic program.

Mobile health-based approaches for smoking cessation resources.

Journal Title: 
Publication Date: 
Jun 27, 2013

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To describe how the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service (CIS) smoking-related resources on a mobile health (mHealth) platform were integrated into the workflow of RNs in advanced practice nurse (APN) training and to examine awareness and use of CIS reso

Nursing informatics: the key to unlocking contemporary nursing practice.

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Publication Date: 
Aug 11, 2003

Nursing informatics is a relatively new nursing specialty. Recognized by the American Nurses' Association in 1992, this field within nursing has grown exponentially.

Use of personal digital assistants with acute care nurse practitioner students.

Journal Title: 
Publication Date: 
Aug 11, 2003

Personal digital assistants (PDAs) are attaining increased functionality by acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs). Supplemented by recently developed medical software, these devices assist nurse practitioners in having information available at the point of care.

The use of handheld computers in scenario-based procedural assessments.

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Publication Date: 
Sep 16, 2004

This paper describes the authors' experiences of using handheld computers within scenario-based formative assessments aimed at developing clinical procedural skills. Previous experiences of using paper forms in these assessments were problematic.

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